Eco-Friendly Habitat Management

Photo: Mary Smalling

By providing alternatives to traditional methods of habitat management, eco-friendly techniques are becoming more popular among land managers and property owners. Eco-friendly methods lessen the impact to the land by introducing less soil erosion and compaction, using less chemicals and fossil fuels, and resulting in less waste by providing an outlet for non-timber forest products such as gnarled wood, tree bark, and even essential oils. Audubon has employed these “green” techniques while stewarding habitat restoration for the Golden-winged Warbler and other priority bird species.

Goats Help Restore Golden-wing Habitat
Forest Management - Working Lands

Goats Help Restore Golden-wing Habitat

Goats will munch the leaves, woody stems, and high vegetative growth that many grazing animals will not. They don’t like to eat grass. This makes them the perfect partner in Golden-winged Warbler habitat management.

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Lighting Fires for Birds and Land in North Carolina
Working Lands

Lighting Fires for Birds and Land in North Carolina

Fire has been used in a variety of ways throughout human history to benefit people-- we're using it to give life back to forests and birds.

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The Sweet Smell of a Successful Forestry Project
GWWA Conservation - Working Lands

The Sweet Smell of a Successful Forestry Project

Nothing is wasted at this former Christmas-tree farm site, where Golden-winged Warblers are now breeding and an essential-oils company is brewing a Fraser Fir aromatic.

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News & Updates

Empowering Women Landowners for the Birds
Working Lands

Empowering Women Landowners for the Birds

ForestHer NC workshop series reaches out to important but overlooked landowner group.

Audubon, NC DEQ's Regan, Grandfather Mountain officials talk WNC climate threats
Working Lands

Audubon, DEQ Sec. Regan, Grandfather Mountain officials talk climate threats in WNC

— More than half of the breeding birds in the state threatened by changes to our climate can be found in western North Carolina.
Learning in the Field
Working Lands

Learning in the Field

Audubon intern Sylvine Hill paddles through a swamp and talks with landowners to learn lessons in conservation

For One Western North Carolina Landowner, Retirement is for the Birds
Working Lands

For One Western North Carolina Landowner, Retirement is for the Birds

Russell Blevins' commitment to habitat management is good news for the Golden-winged Warblers that share his property with him.

Letting it Grow: How Landowners are Helping Birds by Mowing Less
Forest Legacy Landbird Project - Working Lands

Letting it Grow: How Landowners are Helping Birds by Mowing Less

Allison Bovée and Mary Vogel have changed their landscaping practices at BirdTown Cabins in western North Carolina to create new bird habitat.

Neighbors Band Together for Golden-winged Warblers
Conservation

Neighbors Band Together for Golden-winged Warblers

In Mitchell County, landowners are turning a power line right-of-way into prime habitat for a declining warbler.

Welcoming Golden-winged Warblers to a Working Farm
Conservation

Welcoming Golden-winged Warblers to a Working Farm

The owners of Shady Grove Gardens in Ashe County open their farm to birds and birders every spring.

Steward It and They Will Come
Working Lands

Steward It and They Will Come

The owners of B and L Organic farm carefully steward their land for Golden-winged Warblers and other wildlife.

Baseball for the Birds: A New North Carolina Team Rallies Around an Endangered Species
Working Lands

Baseball for the Birds: A New North Carolina Team Rallies Around an Endangered Species

Inspired by the Red-cockaded Woodpecker's resilience, the Houston Astros affiliate has chosen the bird to be its official mascot.

Priority Bird Profile: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Working Lands

Priority Bird Profile: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is one of about a dozen “priority species” that the National Audubon Society’s Healthy Forest initiative has chosen to help through active forest protection and management.

How you can help, right now