Ways to Help

Learn about the different ways you can make a gift to Audubon North Carolina.

Photo: Walker Golder

Audubon North Carolina is responsible for raising all of the funds needed to support Audubon's work in North Carolina. The majority of our support comes from individuals, and every dollar donated directly to Audubon North Carolina goes to work in our state.

Our bird's future, and often our own future, depends on the dollars raised today.

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Donate

Ways to Give

Learn about the different ways you can make a gift to Audubon North Carolina.

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Cardinal Club Monthly Giving Program
Donate

Cardinal Club Monthly Giving Program

Join the Cardinal Club, our monthly giving program, and put your contribution to work for birds every day of the year. 

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T. Gilbert Pearson Society
Donate

T. Gilbert Pearson Society

Audubon North Carolina's T. Gilbert Pearson Society members are among our most generous supporters, making an annual gift of $1,000 or more.

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Get Involved
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Get Involved

Sign-up for bulletins delivered to your email box on topics of special interest to you!

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Volunteer
Volunteer

Volunteer

Audubon North Carolina welcomes volunteers in nearly all of our program areas.

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Ways to Help
Citizen Science

Ways to Help

You don’t have to be a researcher to support bird conservation across our state. You just have to love birds!

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Get Involved in Our Work to Protect Birds

North Carolina is for the Birds During the Great Backyard Bird Count
Citizen Science

North Carolina is for the Birds During the Great Backyard Bird Count

The GBBC is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society with partner Bird Studies Canada. Learn about Audubon’s Great Backyard Bird Count.

116 Years and Growing
Birding And Bird Watching

116 Years and Growing

Help count birds for citizen science during the 116th Audubon Christmas Bird Count.

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Patrick Farrell
Working Lands

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Patrick Farrell

Meet Patrick Farrell, Audubon North Carolina partner and NC Wildlife Resources Commission professional biologist assisting Audubon landowners in habitat restoration efforts to benefit the imperiled Golden-winged Warbler.

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Russ Oates
Working Lands

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Russ Oates

Russ is an active volunteer in Audubon North Carolina’s Working Lands program. By participating in our volunteer training program in the mountains, he learned how to survey for and identify Golden-winged Warbler habitat to help ongoing restoration efforts for the priority species.

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Bob Repoley
Working Lands

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Bob Repoley

Our volunteers help lay the groundwork for Audubon NC to identify and engage private landowners in habitat restoration for priority species including the Golden-winged Warbler.

Count Birds for Science
Citizen Science

Count Birds for Science

Whether you’ve been watching birds for two decades or two weeks, there are many easy ways you can help protect birds in backyards across America.

Help Unlock New Secrets – Become a Citizen Scientist
Working Lands

Help Unlock New Secrets – Become a Citizen Scientist

Citizen science data helps unlock new secrets every day about the birds we love making conservation success stories possible.

How Banding Supports Bird Conservation Science
Seas & Shores

How Banding Supports Bird Conservation Science

Bird banding is a valuable tool in the study and conservation of many bird species. Explore insights gleaned from the observation of banded birds.

Quest for Banded Birds: The 18-Year Journey of a Brown Pelican
Seas & Shores

Quest for Banded Birds: The 18-Year Journey of a Brown Pelican

The oldest known Brown Pelican was 43. Bird banding research allows biologists to uncover data to help protect and conserve priority species throughout their life cycle.

How you can help, right now