Identifying New Golden-Winged Warbler Locations

Photo: Ed Buress

Engaging private landowners has many benefits, including those for the landowner, birds and to the entire Audubon network. In the first three years of having an Audubon biologist on the ground in the mountains, we identified 30 new Golden-winged Warbler territories, which amounts to a three percent increase for this region’s estimated population of as many as 1,000 birds.

Access to private land and the open ears of mountain residents greatly help scientists better identify Golden-Wing Warblers in their natural habitat. If you are one of the many residents of Western North Carolina that live above 3,000 feet elevation and are surrounded by early successional habitat, you may want to learn the Golden-winged Warbler song, as you may just hear one in the spring or summer in your own backyard.

Ready to get involved? We train volunteers to help us find new locations. Contact Field Biologist Aimee Tomcho for more information.

News & Updates

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Forestry In Action

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Longtime Audubon volunteer revives his own property for the birds
Forestry In Action

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Lifelong appreciation of wildlife motivates Russ Oates’ conservation efforts on his Yancey County property and as an Audubon volunteer.

How you can help, right now