Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Photo: Connie Pinson

The Southern Coastal Plain climate stronghold includes numerous river systems, estuaries, bogs and cypress swamps that will help support coniferous forest (pine-dominated) birds. Combined with its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean, this area’s many water bodies can provide refuge in a changing climate. Protecting land in the southern coastal plain, ensuring forests are managed in a bird-friendly way and growing native plants in coastal towns and cities are key priorities for Audubon in this area.

Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Key climate-threatened birds and habitat “guilds”

Climate-threatened birds can be grouped according to the type of habitat that they prefer.  This climate stronghold is likely to include suitable habitat and climate conditions for many birds threatened by climate change, including key birds listed below.

Coniferous forest species:

Key Conservation Partners

Government: Natural Resources Conservation Service, North Carolina State Parks, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, North Carolina Forest Service, North Carolina Division of Soil & Water Conservation

National & State NGOs: The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, Conservation Trust for North Carolina

Local Land Trusts: North Carolina Coastal Land Trust

Blue Ridge Mountains_akshay_flickr_CC

Blue Ridge Mountains Photo: Akshay/Flickr CC

How you can help climate-threatened birds

  1. Sign up for Audubon North Carolina’s action alerts. Find out when state lawmakers are making important decisions that will impact protection of climate strongholds and other natural areas in the state. Click here to join.
  2. Become an Audubon Ambassador. Audubon Ambassadors are volunteers working with state staff, Audubon chapters, and local communities to spread the word about the effect of climate change on birds, which includes recruiting others with a hopeful, solutions-oriented message.
  3. Grow native plants. Your yard and the plants in it can make a big difference for wildlife. Growing native plants provides critical food and shelter for birds to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.
  4. Are you a birder? Help Audubon refine and improve our climate modeling by participating in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count and Climate Watch. Your participation will help us continue to refine our climate models and prioritize actions to protect birds.

News & Updates

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Missing White Ibis Return to Battery Island After Year-long Hiatus

Audubon members and the Cape Fear Garden Club get up-close view of ibis nesting season on the Cape Fear River.

Audubon fills NC General Assembly on Lobby Day to advocate for birds
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Audubon fills NC General Assembly on Lobby Day to advocate for birds

Members from across the state sat down with lawmakers to talk about conservation funding and clean energy.

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Birds Tell Us About Water Quality in the Cape Fear River

UNC Wilmington graduate student Anna Zarn is studying American Oystercatcher eggshells and chick feathers to better understand toxic-metal contamination in the Lower Cape Fear River post-Florence.

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2018 Lame-duck Session Ends

— The North Carolina legislature's special session was a good one for birds.
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Bird-Friendly Communities

Join the 119th Audubon Christmas Bird Count

We need volunteers for the longest-running community science project in the world, this Dec. 14 through Jan. 5.

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Wind, military, birds can co-exist

Read Executive Director Andrew Hutson's op-ed in the Daily Advance here.

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Updates From Our Coast: After the Storm

Here in North Carolina, we continue to feel and see the effects of Hurricane Florence on our coast. We are grateful that all our staff are safe, yet aware that the path forward will be challenging. Stay up-to-date here.

Four Ways to Protect North Carolina after Hurricane Florence
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Four Ways to Protect North Carolina after Hurricane Florence

While we are still learning the full extent of the devastation that Florence brought, we do know one thing – it is time to change the way we design and live in our coastal communities.

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Does egg color influence nesting success?

A UNC-Wilmington undergraduate conducts honors thesis research on Least Tern egg patterning as it relates to thermal biology.

After 27 Years of Service, a Veteran Is Using Her Training for Conservation
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After 27 Years of Service, a Veteran Is Using Her Training for Conservation

Mary Abrams joined Audubon's Climate Ambassador program to serve and protect habitats like the ones where she grew up.

How you can help, right now