Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Photo: Connie Pinson

The Southern Coastal Plain climate stronghold includes numerous river systems, estuaries, bogs and cypress swamps that will help support coniferous forest (pine-dominated) birds. Combined with its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean, this area’s many water bodies can provide refuge in a changing climate. Protecting land in the southern coastal plain, ensuring forests are managed in a bird-friendly way and growing native plants in coastal towns and cities are key priorities for Audubon in this area.

Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Key climate-threatened birds and habitat “guilds”

Climate-threatened birds can be grouped according to the type of habitat that they prefer.  This climate stronghold is likely to include suitable habitat and climate conditions for many birds threatened by climate change, including key birds listed below.

Coniferous forest species:

Key Conservation Partners

Government: Natural Resources Conservation Service, North Carolina State Parks, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, North Carolina Forest Service, North Carolina Division of Soil & Water Conservation

National & State NGOs: The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, Conservation Trust for North Carolina

Local Land Trusts: North Carolina Coastal Land Trust

Blue Ridge Mountains_akshay_flickr_CC

Blue Ridge Mountains Photo: Akshay/Flickr CC

How you can help climate-threatened birds

  1. Sign up for Audubon North Carolina’s action alerts. Find out when state lawmakers are making important decisions that will impact protection of climate strongholds and other natural areas in the state. Click here to join.
  2. Become an Audubon Ambassador. Audubon Ambassadors are volunteers working with state staff, Audubon chapters, and local communities to spread the word about the effect of climate change on birds, which includes recruiting others with a hopeful, solutions-oriented message.
  3. Grow native plants. Your yard and the plants in it can make a big difference for wildlife. Growing native plants provides critical food and shelter for birds to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.
  4. Are you a birder? Help Audubon refine and improve our climate modeling by participating in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count and Climate Watch. Your participation will help us continue to refine our climate models and prioritize actions to protect birds.

News & Updates

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#ShareTheShore Digital Toolkit

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Audubon, DEQ Sec. Regan, Grandfather Mountain officials talk climate threats in WNC

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— More than 200 species that breed, winter, and migrate through North Carolina are vulnerable.
Oct. 17 -- Survival By Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink
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Oct. 17 Event: Survival By Degrees

Join us to learn about Audubon's brand-new report and the North Carolina birds at risk from climate change.

How you can help, right now