Coast

Conserving North Carolina's Coasts

Photo: Lindsay Addison

The Coastal Program takes a full life-cycle approach to the conservation of birds living on the coast by focusing on the protection of key sites and habitats that shore-dependent birds require at critical points in their annual cycle. The program combines local community engagement, the best available science and proven, site-based conservation methods to stabilize and recover populations of coastal birds.

The cumulative effect of full life-cycle conservation will be to recover declining populations, achieve no net loss of habitat and stabilize populations by 2030.

Sharing Our Ocean & Shores
Coast

Sharing Our Ocean & Shores

Protecting coastal habitats for generations to come.

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Coastal Islands Sanctuary Program
Coast

Coastal Islands Sanctuary Program

For more than 25 years, Audubon’s Coastal Island Sanctuary Program has been a model for conservation along the Atlantic Flyway.

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Coastal Birds: Your Top Questions, Answered
Coast

Coastal Birds: Your Top Questions, Answered

We hope these FAQs on coastal birds will help you find the birds you most wish to see, better support birds during nesting and migration season, and more!

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Birds You Can Help Right Now

   

Latest Coast Posts

How Beach Heat Affects Birds
Coast

How Beach Heat Affects Birds

The warming of the planet may have severe implications for wildlife. Thermal mapping can help us predict what may happen to beach birds and determine how we can protect them in the future.

Midseason Coastal Nesting Update
Coast

Midsummer Beach Nesting Update

The year began with a cold spring, but has so far been generally successful for terns, oystercatchers and skimmers thanks to the absence of major storms or human distubance events.

Priority Bird Profile: Black Skimmer
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: Black Skimmer

The skimmer is also one of the only birds to have a lower mandible that is longer than its upper mandible. This enables the skimming behavior that earned them their name.

Priority Bird Profile: Great Egret
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: Great Egret

The symbol of the National Audubon Society, Great Egrets were nearly wiped out by plume hunters in the United States during the late 1800s. Learn where to find them, how to help them, and more in this Priority Bird Profile.

Priority Bird Profile: White Ibis
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: White Ibis

White Ibis are abundant in North Carolina, but it’s important to maintain safe, high quality nesting sites and other habitats to ensure their populations remain healthy. Learn where to find them, how to help them, and more in this Priority Bird Profile: White Ibis.

Coastal BioTech Anna Parot Returns to Lea-Hutaff
Coast

Coastal BioTech Anna Parot Returns to Lea-Hutaff

Anna Parot has returned to Audubon NC for a second summer supporting American Oystercatchers on Lea-Hutaff island.

Nest Watch in 360: Pelicans, Terns and Ibis
Coast

Watch the Action: Cape Fear River Nesting Season

Experience a literal bird’s eye view of nesting season on the Lower Cape Fear River sanctuary islands in our new series of interactive 360-degree videos!

Priority Bird Profile: Piping Plovers
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: Piping Plovers

North Carolina is the only state where Piping Plovers are found as both breeding and wintering birds – meaning they inhabit the coast year-round! Learn where to find them, how to help them, and more in this Priority Bird Profile: Piping Plovers.

UNC-W Student Studies Oyster Health on the Lower Cape Fear River
Conservation

UNC-W Student Studies Oyster Health on the Lower Cape Fear River

Alexis Marti is a master’s student at UNC-W. She is working with her advisor, Troy Alphin, to assess oyster health on the Lower Cape Fear River as part of Audubon North Carolina’s oyster reef enhancement project.

American Oystercatcher Winter Census Flies Over North Carolina
Coast

American Oystercatcher Winter Census Flies Over North Carolina

Audubon North Carolina and fellow members of the American Oystercatcher Working Group conducted the third range-wide winter survey for oystercatchers.

How you can help, right now