Forest Management

Learn how forest management benefits birds.

Photo: Connie Pinson

Many of our birds need access to healthy forests for raising baby birds, stopover points during migration, and cover and food in winter. A healthy forest ecosystem meets those needs by providing a variety of plant species, tree heights and ages, and safe places such as dead trees and ground debris. Through engagement with foresters and natural resource partners, Audubon North Carolina promotes bird-friendly forest management techniques, including introducing small canopy gaps, promoting mid-story growth, encouraging mast-producing trees and shrubs for year-round forage, and increasing the number of cavity trees.

Integrating bird conservation strategies with the existing goals of landowners, biologists, hunters, foresters, recreationists and other groups will expand our conservation efforts and the impact for North Carolina birds.

Learn more about our Bird-Friendly Forest Management initiatives.

With Small Changes, Forest Management Benefits Birds
Working Lands

With Small Changes, Forest Management Benefits Birds

Last month, nearly 50 foresters were trained in management practices to benefit birds in NC.

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Bird-Friendly Forestry Training Increases Land Stewardship
Working Lands

Bird-Friendly Forestry Training Increases Land Stewardship

Outreach to private landowners is an important step in increasing land stewardship for our imperiled species. The Audubon staff works with partners to present the latest research and programs associated with the best forest management practices for birds.

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News & Updates

Surveying the Presence of the Declining Golden-winged Warbler
GWWA Conservation - Working Lands

Surveying the Presence of the Declining Golden-winged Warbler

A secretive bird, Golden-winged Warblers tend to go undetected in standard point count surveys, so we use a method that can detect their presence more accurately.

OWASA Recognized for Bird-friendly Forestry Plan
Forest Legacy Landbird Project

OWASA Recognized for Bird-friendly Forestry Plan

Audubon North Carolina and Orange Water and Sewer Authority encourage bird-friendly management practices in Cane Creek Reservoir.

Highland Biological Students Focus on Golden-wings
Working Lands

Highland Biological Students Focus on Golden-wings

Budding young scientists are working to protect the Golden-winged Warblers we love.

Horse logging in Appalachia
Forest Management - Working Lands

Horse logging in Appalachia

An unlikely pair, these draft horses are restoring habitat for the Golden-winged Warbler.

Published Work on Golden-winged Warbler Conservation and Biology
Working Lands

Published Work on Golden-winged Warbler Conservation and Biology

Review recent peer reviewed and thesis papers done by Audubon staff, our academic partners at Appalachian and elsewhere.

Goats Help Restore Golden-wing Habitat
Forest Management - Working Lands

Goats Help Restore Golden-wing Habitat

Goats will munch the leaves, woody stems, and high vegetative growth that many grazing animals will not. They don’t like to eat grass. This makes them the perfect partner in Golden-winged Warbler habitat management.

Audubon North Carolina Hosts Yale University’s Sustainable Family Forest Initiative Trainers for Two-Day Workshop
Working Lands

Audubon North Carolina Hosts Yale University’s Sustainable Family Forest Initiative Trainers for Two-Day Workshop

Yale University's Sustaining Family Forests Initiative strategizes on how to connect with forestland owners during conference.

Audubon Signs Designate Specialized Habitat
Working Lands

Audubon Signs Designate Specialized Habitat

Private Landowners Contribute to Successful Habitat Restoration and Management to benefit the Golden-winged Warbler.

Regional Land Management Outreach Initiative to Protect More Golden-Winged Warbler Habitats
Media Releases

Regional Land Management Outreach Initiative to Protect More Golden-Winged Warbler Habitats

1,000 private landowners across nine Western NC counties identified for next wave of Working Lands outreach.

How you can help, right now