Coast

Conserving North Carolina's Coasts

Photo: Lindsay Addison

The Coastal Program takes a full life-cycle approach to the conservation of birds living on the coast by focusing on the protection of key sites and habitats that shore-dependent birds require at critical points in their annual cycle. The program combines local community engagement, the best available science and proven, site-based conservation methods to stabilize and recover populations of coastal birds.

The cumulative effect of full life-cycle conservation will be to recover declining populations, achieve no net loss of habitat and stabilize populations by 2030.

Sharing Our Ocean & Shores
Coast

Sharing Our Ocean & Shores

Protecting coastal habitats for generations to come.

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Coastal Islands Sanctuary Program
Coast

Coastal Islands Sanctuary Program

For more than 25 years, Audubon’s Coastal Island Sanctuary Program has been a model for conservation along the Atlantic Flyway.

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Beach Nesting Season Off to a Great Start
Conservation

Beach Nesting Season Off to a Great Start

This summer, the Wrightsville Beach nesting colony has 349 Least Tern pairs, 123 Black Skimmer pairs, 14 Common Tern pairs and four oystercatcher pairs nesting on the beach.

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Birds You Can Help Right Now

   

Latest Coast Posts

Oystercatcher Banding Day Part 1
Coast

Oystercatcher Banding Day Part 1

Learn about the banding process to monitor shorebirds along the coast.

Ocracoke Inlet Islands Update
Coast

Ocracoke Inlet Islands Update

The Ocracoke Inlet is home to several islands providing a vibrant nesting habitat for shorebirds.

The History of Bird Banding, Part II
Coast

The History of Bird Banding, Part II

Bird Banding is an invaluable tool for citizen scientists to help shape our understanding of birds. The modern system scientists use today only began to take shape in the early 1900s! Learn about the history of Bird Banding.

The History of Bird Banding, Part I
Coast

The History of Bird Banding, Part I

The scientific use of banding was furthered by John James Audubon, one of the first to conduct banding experiments in North America. Learn how this practice originated hundreds of years earlier.

Cape Fear River Nesting Update
Coast

Cape Fear River Nesting Update

Many islands dot the Cape Fear River, but just about eight or nine islands host nesting birds. These nesting islands provide a variety of habits from open sand to shrub and tree thickets.

How to Help a Bird Caught in Fishing Line
Coast

How to Help a Bird Caught in Fishing Line

Usually, birds and people fishing get along just fine, but when fishing line and birds intersect, dangerous complications can arise. Luckily, there are ways people can help!

Nesting Update: Lea- Hutaff Island
Coast

Nesting Update: Lea- Hutaff Island

Between Topsail Island to the north and Figure 8 Island to the south, there lies a haven for wildlife: Lea-Hutaff Island providing habitat for nesting birds and sea turtles.

Nesting Update: The South End of Wrightsville Beach, April - May
Coast

Nesting Update: The South End of Wrightsville Beach, April - May

The south end of Wrightsville Beach is an important site for five species of beach-nesting birds.

The South End of Wrightsville Beach – A Vital Bird Habitat
Coast

The South End of Wrightsville Beach – A Vital Bird Habitat

The south end of Wrightsville Beach, N.C. is a favorite among many beach-nesting birds. Each summer, nesting shorebirds arrive to raise the next generation of chicks.

How Banding Supports Bird Conservation Science
Coast

How Banding Supports Bird Conservation Science

Bird banding is a valuable tool in the study and conservation of many bird species. Explore insights gleaned from the observation of banded birds.

How you can help, right now