Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Photo: Connie Pinson

The Southern Coastal Plain climate stronghold includes numerous river systems, estuaries, bogs and cypress swamps that will help support coniferous forest (pine-dominated) birds. Combined with its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean, this area’s many water bodies can provide refuge in a changing climate. Protecting land in the southern coastal plain, ensuring forests are managed in a bird-friendly way and growing native plants in coastal towns and cities are key priorities for Audubon in this area.

Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Key climate-threatened birds and habitat “guilds”

Climate-threatened birds can be grouped according to the type of habitat that they prefer.  This climate stronghold is likely to include suitable habitat and climate conditions for many birds threatened by climate change, including key birds listed below.

Coniferous forest species:

Key Conservation Partners

Government: Natural Resources Conservation Service, North Carolina State Parks, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, North Carolina Forest Service, North Carolina Division of Soil & Water Conservation

National & State NGOs: The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, Conservation Trust for North Carolina

Local Land Trusts: North Carolina Coastal Land Trust

Blue Ridge Mountains_akshay_flickr_CC

Blue Ridge Mountains Photo: Akshay/Flickr CC

How you can help climate-threatened birds

  1. Sign up for Audubon North Carolina’s action alerts. Find out when state lawmakers are making important decisions that will impact protection of climate strongholds and other natural areas in the state. Click here to join.
  2. Become an Audubon Ambassador. Audubon Ambassadors are volunteers working with state staff, Audubon chapters, and local communities to spread the word about the effect of climate change on birds, which includes recruiting others with a hopeful, solutions-oriented message.
  3. Grow native plants. Your yard and the plants in it can make a big difference for wildlife. Growing native plants provides critical food and shelter for birds to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.
  4. Are you a birder? Help Audubon refine and improve our climate modeling by participating in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count and Climate Watch. Your participation will help us continue to refine our climate models and prioritize actions to protect birds.

News & Updates

Sea Turtle Nesting Hits a New High on Lea-Hutaff Island
Coast

Sea Turtle Nesting Hits a New High on Lea-Hutaff Island

An estimated 1,458 loggerhead hatchlings made it to the ocean this year, another record number for Lea-Hutaff Island.

Assessing How Shoreline Change Impacts Nesting Waterbirds
Coast

Assessing How Shoreline Change Impacts Nesting Waterbirds

In certain areas along the shoreline in front of a Battery Island nesting colony, erosion is causing vegetation to die back. Here, we assess the extent of this shoreline change and determine how it may impact nesting waterbirds.

2017 Waterbird Nesting Season Recap
Coast

2017 Waterbird Nesting Season Recap

This year the Lower Cape Fear River sites hosted about 20% of the state’s Great Egrets and Brown Pelicans, over 25% of its Royal Terns, and just over 78% of its White Ibis -- one of the largest concentrations of nesting waterbirds in the state.

Oystercatcher Banding Leads to Big Find
Coast

Oystercatcher Banding Leads to Big Find

Oystercatcher banding is a regular management practice - but rarely does it result in finding a 17+ year-old bird!

A Look Back at Nesting Season on the South End of Wrightsville Beach
Coast

A Look Back at Nesting Season at the South End of Wrightsville Beach

Junior Bird Steward Jackson Travis will always remember his summer as a bird savior, and other reflections.

Seeking a Better Approach to Erosion on Ocean Isle Beach
Conservation

Seeking a Better Approach to Erosion on Ocean Isle Beach

Ocean Isle Beach's proposed terminal groin project would be devastating to an area that has long been a haven for boaters, families, and wildlife. Today, Audubon North Carolina challenged this project in federal court.

2017 “End of Session” Legislative Update
Climate

2017 “End of Session” Legislative Update

How did we fare on our key issues? Coastal protection, habitat protection and land conversation, and clean energy saw wins!

Vegetation Management on the Cape Fear River Pays Off
Eco-Friendly Habitat Management

Vegetation Management on the Cape Fear River Pays Off

Through tilling and herbicide treatment, Audubon NC was able to transform these jungle-like islands into ideal open sand nesting grounds for oystercatchers and terns.

Wainwright Island Gets New Sand... and Birds!
Coast

Wainwright Island Gets New Sand... and Birds!

Manmade dredged-material islands are vital for the state’s populations of Royal and Sandwich terns.

How you can help, right now