Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Photo: Connie Pinson

The Southern Coastal Plain climate stronghold includes numerous river systems, estuaries, bogs and cypress swamps that will help support coniferous forest (pine-dominated) birds. Combined with its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean, this area’s many water bodies can provide refuge in a changing climate. Protecting land in the southern coastal plain, ensuring forests are managed in a bird-friendly way and growing native plants in coastal towns and cities are key priorities for Audubon in this area.

Southern Coastal Plain Climate Stronghold

Key climate-threatened birds and habitat “guilds”

Climate-threatened birds can be grouped according to the type of habitat that they prefer.  This climate stronghold is likely to include suitable habitat and climate conditions for many birds threatened by climate change, including key birds listed below.

Coniferous forest species:

Key Conservation Partners

Government: Natural Resources Conservation Service, North Carolina State Parks, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, North Carolina Forest Service, North Carolina Division of Soil & Water Conservation

National & State NGOs: The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, Conservation Trust for North Carolina

Local Land Trusts: North Carolina Coastal Land Trust

Blue Ridge Mountains_akshay_flickr_CC

Blue Ridge Mountains Photo: Akshay/Flickr CC

How you can help climate-threatened birds

  1. Sign up for Audubon North Carolina’s action alerts. Find out when state lawmakers are making important decisions that will impact protection of climate strongholds and other natural areas in the state. Click here to join.
  2. Become an Audubon Ambassador. Audubon Ambassadors are volunteers working with state staff, Audubon chapters, and local communities to spread the word about the effect of climate change on birds, which includes recruiting others with a hopeful, solutions-oriented message.
  3. Grow native plants. Your yard and the plants in it can make a big difference for wildlife. Growing native plants provides critical food and shelter for birds to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.
  4. Are you a birder? Help Audubon refine and improve our climate modeling by participating in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count and Climate Watch. Your participation will help us continue to refine our climate models and prioritize actions to protect birds.

News & Updates

How Beach Heat Affects Birds
Coast

How Beach Heat Affects Birds

The warming of the planet may have severe implications for wildlife. Thermal mapping can help us predict what may happen to beach birds and determine how we can protect them in the future.

Midseason Coastal Nesting Update
Coast

Midsummer Beach Nesting Update

The year began with a cold spring, but has so far been generally successful for terns, oystercatchers and skimmers thanks to the absence of major storms or human distubance events.

Priority Bird Profile: Black Skimmer
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: Black Skimmer

The skimmer is also one of the only birds to have a lower mandible that is longer than its upper mandible. This enables the skimming behavior that earned them their name.

"No Plastic Picnic" Wipes Out Waste
Bird-Friendly Communities

"No Plastic Picnic" Wipes Out Waste!

At Mecklenburg Audubon Society's annual picnic, members ditched plastic utensils, disposable bags, and straws in favor of plates and cups from home.

Priority Bird Profile: Great Egret
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: Great Egret

The symbol of the National Audubon Society, Great Egrets were nearly wiped out by plume hunters in the United States during the late 1800s. Learn where to find them, how to help them, and more in this Priority Bird Profile.

Expanding Bird-Friendly Renewable Energy
Advocacy

Expanding Bird-Friendly Renewable Energy

Responsibly sited wind, solar and other renewable energy resources can help ensure the protection of our birds by providing cleaner air and water, and lessening the impact of pollution on the places birds need.

Priority Bird Profile: White Ibis
Coast

Priority Bird Profile: White Ibis

White Ibis are abundant in North Carolina, but it’s important to maintain safe, high quality nesting sites and other habitats to ensure their populations remain healthy. Learn where to find them, how to help them, and more in this Priority Bird Profile: White Ibis.

Coastal BioTech Anna Parot Returns to Lea-Hutaff
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Coastal BioTech Anna Parot Returns to Lea-Hutaff

Anna Parot has returned to Audubon NC for a second summer supporting American Oystercatchers on Lea-Hutaff island.

Nest Watch in 360: Pelicans, Terns and Ibis
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Watch the Action: Cape Fear River Nesting Season

Experience a literal bird’s eye view of nesting season on the Lower Cape Fear River sanctuary islands in our new series of interactive 360-degree videos!

Priority Bird Profile: Piping Plovers
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Priority Bird Profile: Piping Plovers

North Carolina is the only state where Piping Plovers are found as both breeding and wintering birds – meaning they inhabit the coast year-round! Learn where to find them, how to help them, and more in this Priority Bird Profile: Piping Plovers.

How you can help, right now