Capital-Piedmont Climate Stronghold

White-Breasted Nuthatch Photo: Nick Saunders/Great Backyard Bird Count

With the greater Piedmont region of North Carolina expected to become hotter and drier in the future, an area centered around the state capital – Raleigh – may offer refuge from these changes. Located near Jordan Lake, Falls Lake and their associated river systems, this area’s climate may prove critical for deciduous forest birds as the coastal plain climate zone shifts inland. Protecting natural habitat in the rapidly growing greater Raleigh area, ensuring forests are managed in a bird-friendly way and growing native plants are key priorities for Audubon in this region.

Capital-Piedmont Climate Stronghold

Key climate-threatened birds and habitat “guilds”

Climate-threatened birds can be grouped according to the type of habitat that they prefer.  This climate stronghold is likely to include suitable habitat and climate conditions for many birds threatened by climate change, including key birds listed below.

Deciduous forest species:

Key Conservation Partners

Government: National Park Service, National Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, North Carolina State Parks, Wildlife Resources Commission, North Carolina Forest Service, North Carolina Division of Soil & Water Conservation

National & State NGOs: The Nature Conservancy, The Conservation Fund, Conservation Trust for North Carolina

Local Land Trusts: Triangle Land Conservancy, Tar River Land Conservancy

Blue Ridge Mountains_akshay_flickr_CC

Blue Ridge Mountains Photo: Akshay/Flickr CC

How you can help climate-threatened birds

  1. Sign up for Audubon North Carolina’s action alerts. Find out when state lawmakers are making important decisions that will impact protection of climate strongholds and other natural areas in the state. Click here to join.
  2. Become an Audubon Ambassador. Audubon Ambassadors are volunteers working with state staff, Audubon chapters, and local communities to spread the word about the effect of climate change on birds, which includes recruiting others with a hopeful, solutions-oriented message.
  3. Grow native plants. Your yard and the plants in it can make a big difference for wildlife. Planting native plants provides critical food and shelter for birds to survive and thrive in the face of climate change.
  4. Are you a birder? Help Audubon refine and improve our climate modeling by participating in Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count and Climate Watch. Your participation will help us continue to refine our climate models and prioritize actions to protect birds.

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How you can help, right now