Chapters

Get Involved with your Local Chapter

Lifelong birders. Impassioned activists. Plant-lovers. Members of Audubon North Carolina’s ten local chapters are as diverse as the geographic regions they represent.

Chapter members seed conservation projects on many levels, from running bird censuses and monitoring Important Bird Areas, to teaching birding basics to beginners. Thank you to all the chapters for their ongoing support of Audubon's conservation mission.

Below are some chapter achievements from 2013:

  • New Hope Audubon, located in Durham, founded the Piedmont Barn Owl Initiative by installing 12 nest boxes in grassland/agricultural habitat in Orange and Chatham counties.
  • Mecklenburg Audubon Society, located in Charlotte, continues its work on the Lights Out Charlotte program, and is increasing public awareness through community events on issues created for birds through excessive urban lighting. This chapter has been successful, through working with Smart Energy Now, in convincing many building managers to save energy by turning off lights from 11 pm to 5 am.
  • T. Gilbert Pearson Audubon, located in Greensboro, holds monthly Second Sunday Nature Walks and periodic walks at Guilford County nature preserves. Recently, they added a roof on the Audubon Wildlife Overlook, maintained trails at the Audubon Natural Area and created a bluebird trail in an urban park.
  • In the past year, Wake Audubon sponsored 12 monthly public programs, went on 30+ field trips, sponsored 13 "hawk watches" (featuring a nesting pair of Red-tailed Hawks), worked with partners to buy and install wood duck nest boxes, and hosted six chimney swift walks. They also attended four festivals to deliver programs, reaching 2,000+ people. They were also the host chapter of the annual statewide Audubon meeting in 2013.
  • Highlands Plateau Audubon has reached more than 800 children and adults through weekly bird walks, evening programs and educational outreach, and partnered with other conservation organizations, local schools and the Franklin Bird Club.

How you can help, right now