Forest Landbird Legacy Program

Learn about our work to preserve forest blocks across the state.

Photo: John Isenhour/NCWRC

The Forest Landbird Legacy Program (FLLP) guides and supports land management and habitat restoration to benefit forest birds. By establishing a protected and properly managed network of forested landscapes along the Atlantic Flyway, Audubon will work to increase and maintain healthy populations of forest dependent priority species including the Wood Thrush and Golden-winged Warbler. 

Working Lands at Work 
Audubon enlists landowners and foresters to help support birds that depend on forested landscapes along the Atlantic Flyway. This program provides outreach, financial assistance, tools and training that promote bird-friendly forestry practices and drive forest conservation. 

In North Carolina, Audubon collaborates with conservation partners to lead the FLLP initiative establishing outreach and forest stewardship in four focal areas: Northwest Mountains, Central Piedmont and the Uwharries, the Northern Piedmont and the southeastern Coastal Plain. 

Audubon NC staff will reach out to landowners though local foresters and land trust organizations to maintain forest blocks in a way that mimics the characteristics of natural forest dynamics. Methods will include hosting workshops, partnering with landowners to demonstrate beneficial management techniques, and encouraging management that creates quality bird habitats (through varied activities like creating small canopy gaps and cavity trees among other practices) to support forest landbird diversity. Audubon is working with private landowners, government entities and conservation partners, focusing on land parcels with at least 50 acres of 50-year-old+ trees. Working with partner agencies like the US Fish and Wildlife Service and NC Wildlife Resources Commission, we have  identified the best locations to focus our work, facilitating technical and financial assistance on private lands.  

Help Our Work Continue
In just a few years, Audubon North Carolina’s private lands outreach has expanded from early successional forest work focused in Western North Carolina, now leading forest ecosystem stewardship for the conservation of all forest-dwelling landbirds across the North Carolina.

Internationally, FLLP will contribute to Audubon’s goal to impact 35 million acres in the United States and 140,000 acres in Belize as part of the Eastern Priority Forests Initiative

Contribute to the Forest Landbird Legacy Program and all of Audubon’s work to restore habitat for our most imperiled land birds. Click here to make a gift to the Working Lands Program.

The Forest Landbird Legacy Program will work to protect habitats for North Carolina’s most imperiled landbirds including: 

  • American Woodcock
  • Whip-poor-will
  • Wood Thrush
  • Black-throated Green Warbler
  • Swainson’s Warbler
  • Cerulean Warbler
  • Prothonotary Warbler
  • Kentucky Warbler
  • Brown-headed Nuthatch
  • Prairie Warbler
  • Worm-eating Warbler
  • Canada Warbler
  • Golden-winged Warbler 

A special thank you to the program partners collaborating on the Forest Landbird Legacy Progam:

Forest Management
Forest Management - Working Lands

Forest Management

Integrating bird conservation strategies with the existing goals of landowners, biologists, hunters, foresters, recreationists and other groups will expand our conservation efforts and the impact for North Carolina birds.

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Working Lands
Working Lands

Working Lands

Putting Working Lands to Work for Birds and People

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Golden-winged Warbler Conservation
GWWA Conservation - Working Lands

Golden-winged Warbler Conservation

Golden-winged Warbler populations are on the decline in the United States. Learn how Audubon North Carolina is impacting that decline.

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News & Updates

Understanding the Endangered Species List
Working Lands

Understanding the Endangered Species List

Audubon’s Efforts Protect the Golden-winged Warbler From Further Decline.

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Patrick Farrell
Working Lands

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Patrick Farrell

Meet Patrick Farrell, Audubon North Carolina partner and NC Wildlife Resources Commission professional biologist assisting Audubon landowners in habitat restoration efforts to benefit the imperiled Golden-winged Warbler.

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Russ Oates
Working Lands

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Russ Oates

Russ is an active volunteer in Audubon North Carolina’s Working Lands program. By participating in our volunteer training program in the mountains, he learned how to survey for and identify Golden-winged Warbler habitat to help ongoing restoration efforts for the priority species.

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Bob Repoley
Working Lands

Volunteers at Work for Golden-wing Protection with Bob Repoley

Our volunteers help lay the groundwork for Audubon NC to identify and engage private landowners in habitat restoration for priority species including the Golden-winged Warbler.

Help Unlock New Secrets – Become a Citizen Scientist
Working Lands

Help Unlock New Secrets – Become a Citizen Scientist

Citizen science data helps unlock new secrets every day about the birds we love making conservation success stories possible.

New Volunteer Team Meets in the Mountains
Working Lands

New Volunteer Team Meets in the Mountains

A group of 15 volunteers gathers in in Burnsville to learn more about how to help restore habitat for the Golden-winged Warbler.

Wintering with Warblers in Nicaragua
Working Lands

Wintering with Warblers in Nicaragua

Early this year, Curtis Smalling visited our partners in Nicaragua to continue work to study Golden-winged Warblers and protect their wintering habitats.

GWWA Workshop Presentations
Working Lands

GWWA Workshop Presentations

Read great presentations from the last GWWA Working Group Summit.

Landowners Meet For the Golden-wings
Working Lands

Landowners Meet For the Golden-wings

For the last decade, Audubon NC has been a leader in the conservation of the Golden-winged and the GWW working group.

How you can help, right now