Forestry Trainings

Audubon NC is committed to training foresters and landowners how to steward their forests with birds in mind. Bird diversity is indicative of overall forest health. Whether you are preserving your forest for family legacy, looking for a comprehensive management plan, or are planning for harvest, let Audubon biologists help you understand what role birds play in your woods.

Golden-winged Warbler Biologists Plan Training Workshop
Working Lands

Golden-winged Warbler Biologists Plan Training Workshop

In an effort to further expand the reach of this program, a team of biologists and organizations are developing a training workshop for professional land managers in the Central and Southern Appalachian Conservation Regions to be held this Fall.

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Bird-Friendly Forestry Training Increases Land Stewardship
Working Lands

Bird-Friendly Forestry Training Increases Land Stewardship

Outreach to private landowners is an important step in increasing land stewardship for our imperiled species. The Audubon staff works with partners to present the latest research and programs associated with the best forest management practices for birds.

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Golden-winged Warbler
Priority Birds

Golden-winged Warbler

The rapid decline of the Golden-winged Warbler since the 1980s cannot be explained solely by habitat loss, and that mystery has attracted many scientists to study this beautiful warbler.

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News & Updates

Readying for Winter at Cane Creek Reservoir
Forest Legacy Landbird Project

Readying for Winter at Cane Creek Reservoir

Audubon North Carolina biologist Aimee Tomcho joined the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary for Orange Water And Sewer Authority’s Community Open House at the Cane Creek Reservoir.

Restoring 200 Acres for Golden-winged Warblers
Working Lands

Restoring 200 Acres for Golden-winged Warblers

A 50 acre restoration project by these landowners could mean 10 new Golden-winged Warbler territories (and possibly 10 new nests annually!)

Help Golden-winged Warblers Win Farm Bill Funding
GWWA 101 - Working Lands

Help Golden-winged Warblers Win Farm Bill Funding

Want to help us find new GWWA locations and (hopefully) access more Farm Bill funding? Sign up to volunteer!

Small Changes in Forests Are Big for Birds
Working Lands

Small Changes in Hardwood Forests Are Big for Birds

55 species were surveyed at this bird conservation partnership site, including a priority species-- the Wood Thrush!

Lighting Fires for Birds and Land in North Carolina
Working Lands

Lighting Fires for Birds and Land in North Carolina

Fire has been used in a variety of ways throughout human history to benefit people-- we're using it to give life back to forests and birds.

Will 2018 Farm Bill Funding Continue to Benefit Golden-winged Warblers?
Working Lands

Will 2018 Farm Bill Funding Continue to Benefit Golden-winged Warblers?

Farm Bill-funded projects focus on declining species that can benefit from conservation on private lands.

The Sweet Smell of a Successful Forestry Project
GWWA 101 - Working Lands

The Sweet Smell of a Successful Forestry Project

Nothing is wasted at this former Christmas-tree farm site, where Golden-winged Warblers are now breeding and an essential-oils company is brewing a Fraser Fir aromatic.

Survey finds diverse species at bird-friendly forestry site
Forest Legacy Landbird Project

Survey finds diverse species at bird-friendly forestry site

Climate-threatened birds and more were discovered at the Cherokee Scout Reservation this year.

Foresters Gather for Training to Learn Bird-Friendly Techniques
Forestry Trainings

Foresters Gather for Training to Learn Bird-Friendly Techniques

At our highly successful “Foresters for the Birds” workshop, foresters received hands-on training to help them achieve forest health while also benefitting birds!

Local Farmers Use Horses to Restore GWWA Habitat
GWWA Conservation - Working Lands

Local Farmers Use Horses to Restore GWWA Habitat

Allie and Louis employed tree removal using horses, and created gaps in the forest canopy, to encourage continued growth of the vegetation cover GWWAs need to breed.

How you can help, right now