Identifying New Golden-Winged Warbler Locations

Photo: Ed Buress

Engaging private landowners has many benefits, including those for the landowner, birds and to the entire Audubon network. In the first three years of having an Audubon biologist on the ground in the mountains, we identified 30 new Golden-winged Warbler territories, which amounts to a three percent increase for this region’s estimated population of as many as 1,000 birds.

Access to private land and the open ears of mountain residents greatly help scientists better identify Golden-Wing Warblers in their natural habitat. If you are one of the many residents of Western North Carolina that live above 3,000 feet elevation and are surrounded by early successional habitat, you may want to learn the Golden-winged Warbler song, as you may just hear one in the spring or summer in your own backyard.

Ready to get involved? We train volunteers to help us find new locations. Contact Field Biologist Aimee Tomcho for more information.

News & Updates

Surveying the Presence of the Declining Golden-winged Warbler
GWWA Conservation - Working Lands

Surveying the Presence of the Declining Golden-winged Warbler

A secretive bird, Golden-winged Warblers tend to go undetected in standard point count surveys, so we use a method that can detect their presence more accurately.

OWASA Recognized for Bird-friendly Forestry Plan
Forest Legacy Landbird Project

OWASA Recognized for Bird-friendly Forestry Plan

Audubon North Carolina and Orange Water and Sewer Authority encourage bird-friendly management practices in Cane Creek Reservoir.

Golden-winged Warbler Tracking Report
Conserve Golden-Wings

Geolocation Tracking Golden-winged Warblers

Geolocation tracking migration routes is essential to the success of the Golden-winged Warbler.

Highland Biological Students Focus on Golden-wings
Working Lands

Highland Biological Students Focus on Golden-wings

Budding young scientists are working to protect the Golden-winged Warblers we love.

Published Work on Golden-winged Warbler Conservation and Biology
Working Lands

Published Work on Golden-winged Warbler Conservation and Biology

Review recent peer reviewed and thesis papers done by Audubon staff, our academic partners at Appalachian and elsewhere.

Audubon North Carolina Hosts Yale University’s Sustainable Family Forest Initiative Trainers for Two-Day Workshop
Working Lands

Audubon North Carolina Hosts Yale University’s Sustainable Family Forest Initiative Trainers for Two-Day Workshop

Yale University's Sustaining Family Forests Initiative strategizes on how to connect with forestland owners during conference.

Audubon Signs Designate Specialized Habitat
Working Lands

Audubon Signs Designate Specialized Habitat

Private Landowners Contribute to Successful Habitat Restoration and Management to benefit the Golden-winged Warbler.

Regional Land Management Outreach Initiative to Protect More Golden-Winged Warbler Habitats
Media Releases

Regional Land Management Outreach Initiative to Protect More Golden-Winged Warbler Habitats

1,000 private landowners across nine Western NC counties identified for next wave of Working Lands outreach.

Leading Conservation – Working Lands
Donate

Leading Conservation – Working Lands

We know the Golden-winged Warbler and Wood Thrush greatly benefit from connected habitats. One way we are solving this is through our Working Lands Initiative. Donate to support this program.

How you can help, right now