Birds

We love them. Now protect them and thier habitats.

Photo: Lindsay Addison

Why do birds matter?” is one of those questions like “What is love?” or “Why are we here?” or even “Is there a God?” Unanswerable, I think, by logic. One could cite facts like, birds eat lots of harmful insects, charm us at our feeders, or challenge us to learn their field marks, molts, and names both common and scientific. But perhaps the answer lies deeper. Since the beginning birds have lifted our eyes to the skies. They’ve shown us we’re not gravity’s slave, that flight is possible and limitless. It can hover and soar, dive and display, and take us from one end of the planet to the other in a single, impossible burst of energy and purpose. Inspiration is the gift birds have given us from the start. But now they give us a question as well. Like the canary in the mine, they hold the planet up to us like a mirror and ask: “Can you not see that if we pass away, soon you will as well?” That’s a good question, and since birds pose it, they matter a lot.

Wes Craven, Hollywood director

Watching Birds at Home

Answers to common questions about birds
Birds

Answers to common questions about birds

Check out our answers to the most common bird questions we receive.

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Bird Watching
Birds

Bird Watching

Birds have a unique ability to inspire and delight us. Learn about how to best watch feathered friends.

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Bird Feeding Basics
Bird-Friendly Communities

Bird Feeding Basics

Bird feeding can benefit birds and also provides great bird watching from your own backyard. Get easy tips to feed the birds.

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Birding with Kids
Birds

Birding with Kids

Birding can be simple, too, and you don't need to know how to identify a single species to help your kids get started.

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Get Outside and Go Birding

Priority Species
Priority Birds

Priority Species

A priority species is one that is particularly threatened in terms of the species' long-term survival.  

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Saving North Carolina's Climate Threatened Birds
Climate

Saving North Carolina's Climate Threatened Birds

Learn about 13 climate-threatened species in North Carolina, and see how we are working to help them survive and thrive.

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Bird species included in the Audubon North Carolina Conservation Plan

American Oystercatcher
Priority Birds

American Oystercatcher

American Oystercatchers are the most recognizable of all North Carolina shorebirds. They can be found along the North Carolina coast year-round, nesting on sandy beaches and islands. 

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Black Skimmer
Priority Birds

Black Skimmer

The global population of Black Skimmers has been reduced to 165,000, and they have been classified as a Species of Special Concern in NC, due to loss of breeding habitat.

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Bobolink
Priority Birds

Bobolink

With reforestation of abandoned farmland and further development of the region, the Bobolink population has seen a dramatic decline. 

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Brown-headed Nuthatch
Priority Birds

Brown-headed Nuthatch

The Brown-headed Nuthatch is fondly known to Audubon North Carolina (ANC) as our quintessential southern bird. 

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Brown Pelican
Priority Birds

Brown Pelican

In North Carolina, Brown Pelicans are found in coastal marine and estuarine waters. .

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Cerulean Warbler
Priority Birds

Cerulean Warbler

Cerulean Warbler is one of the species of highest conservation concern and is been considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act.

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Chimney Swift
Priority Birds

Chimney Swift

The small, agile, fast-flying Chimney Swift is readily identified by its characteristic "flying cigar" profile. 

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Golden-winged Warbler
Priority Birds

Golden-winged Warbler

The rapid decline of the Golden-winged Warbler since the 1980s cannot be explained solely by habitat loss, and that mystery has attracted many scientists to study this beautiful warbler.

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Green-winged Teal
Priority Birds

Green-winged Teal

The first to arrive and last to leave, the Green-winged Teal spends a very short period wintering in southern states including North Carolina, so spotting one may require some planning. 

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Least Tern
Priority Birds

Least Tern

Colloquially known as the “little striker” for its headlong dives in pursuit of fish, the Least Tern is, as its name suggests, North America’s smallest tern.

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Piping Plover
Priority Birds

Piping Plover

Piping Plovers are federally threatened and endangered shorebirds, which inhabit wide, open beaches, shorelines and dry lakebeds in North America.

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Saltmarsh Sparrow
Priority Birds

Saltmarsh Sparrow

Saltmarsh Sparrows are tiny, social birds weighing less than 1 ounce. It can be difficult to spot this bird as they spend most of their time on the ground within the tall grasses of a salt marsh where they make a home.

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Tundra Swan
Priority Birds

Tundra Swan

The Tundra Swan is known for its exquisite features and courting rituals, which have made it revered throughout history.

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White Ibis
Priority Birds

White Ibis

White Ibis may be seen foraging on lawns or neighborhood ponds, especially in August after nesting season concludes, but marshes, swamps and other wetlands are their native habitat.

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Wood Thrush
Priority Birds

Wood Thrush

As its population has declined nearly 40 percent, the Wood Thrush has been designated a priority for conservation within our global and state IBAs. 

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More Birds Posts

National Park Service finally issues rules for responsible beach driving in Cape Hatteras

National Park Service finally issues rules for responsible beach driving in Cape Hatteras

On January 20, 2012, the National Park Service announced new rules to manage off-road vehicles at Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

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